Old Photos of Liverpool, Maps and Old Liverpool Books

 Liverpool City Group
  past and present

 



Welcome to our extensive gallery of old images of Liverpool. Mostly, they have been collected from our extensive library of old Liverpool books, all of which have been out of circulation for more than a 100 years.

In order to make these very rare Liverpool books availability for you today, we have meticulously and faithfully reproduced them in epub eBook format so you can see and purchase them for your own collection in our shop

Results that match your search: 378


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Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-park-road-steble-street-wash-house-1874
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Wash House Steble Street, Dingle, L.8 - 1874

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

THE CORPORATION WASH-HOUSE AND BATHS, were opened in June, 1842, and are situated in Upper Frederick-street, a little above St. Thomas' church. It is a convenient brick building, with a large reservoir and boilers attached, fitted up with numerous apartments, in which are warm, cold, and shower baths, both private and public. The lower part of the building, and out-house, are occupied as wash-houses, and have large troughs with sloping sides, divided into compartments, ranged round the walls, as well as others in the centre of the room. Into these hot and cold water is admitted by pipes. The scale of charges is, for a warm bath, 2d.; private ditto, 6d. ; and for the use of tubs, water, and drying in the wash-house. 1d. for not more than six hours; and it is expected that these extremely moderate rates, will induce the poorer classes to exercise the virtue of cleanliness, which is so essential to health.

In the 1950s and 60s, women used to put the weeks wash into a large sheet and tie the four corners together like a giant plum pudding. This would then be transported to the wash-house either balanced on their heads or pushed in an old pram.

This meant that Saturday mornings and school holidays called for an early start for us kids. The first order of the day was to collect as many empty lemonade bottles as we could find and take them back to the shops for the 3d deposit that was paid for all returns. Armed with enough money, we would head for Stebie Street baths for 2 hours of swimming (6d) and after that we'd go round the corner into the wash-house where we'd get a cup of oxo (2d) and a slice of toast (1d). All this for 3 empty bottles - yeah!

Then the serious business of choosing one of the prams lined up outside, would begin. After all, you can't make a good steerie (go-kart) without pram wheels. Those were the days, my friend!!!

  REF: 4300


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l6-collegiate-institution-shaw-street-2-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Collegiate Institution Shaw Street, Everton, L.6 - 1843

 

  REF: 4230


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l5-st-matthews-church-scotland-road-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Matthews Church Scotland Road, Vauxhall, L.5 - 1843

 

  REF: 4225


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l5-sandhills-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Sandhills House , Kirkdale, L.5 - 1843

 

  REF: 4223


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l5-everton-st-georges-church-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St George's Church , Everton, L.5 - 1831

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

ST. GEORGE'S CHURCH, (EVERTON.)

This church, which was erected in 1814, on the site of the old beacon, is a handsome Gothic building of red sandstone. It is lighted by seven windows on each side, between each of which is an abutment terminating in a pinnacle. The whole of the window-frames, pillars, arches, groins, roof, &c. are of cast iron, giving the interior a light and tasteful appearance. In the church is a beautifully painted window, and at the other end of the church is a Gothic tower, 96 feet high, each angle of which is finished by a pinnacle.

  REF: 4211


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-stanley-park-1910
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Stanley Park , Walton, L.4 - 1910

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

In 1835 it would have been easy for the Town Council at comparatively small expense to surround the town, as it then was, with a continuous ring of parks. The Town Council was too much engrossed with other questions, and too eager for economy. The first fifteen years of the reformed Council were very fully occupied with urgent reforms : it was these years which produced the great building acts, the first clearance of the slums, the initiation of the new water supply, and the origination of the public library, and amid all these activities it is perhaps not surprising that parks were forgotten. In 1848, indeed, the Newsham estate was purchased with a view to turning it into a public park, but nothing was done. The truth is that in the middle years of the century a distinct slackening is noticeable in the zeal for public improvement. The town was flourishing ; everybody was engrossed in the building up of fortunes ; and as there was no considerable body of opinion to which these things were of secondary interest, the Council was loth to undertake new and costly enterprises.

But in 1868 the spirit of improvement revived again, and the first question taken in hand was the provision of parks. In that year parliamentary powers were obtained for the creation of no less than three great public pleasure-grounds - Sefton, Newsham and Stanley Parks, costing in all 670,000. From that time onwards no good opportunity of obtaining fresh breathing-spaces has been neglected, the latest and most beautiful of these acquisitions being that of Calderstones Park. Private munificence has come to the aid of public funds, both in the provision of land (as in the case of the princely gift of Wavertree Playground in 1895, or of Bowring Park in 1906) or in the equipment of the parks with palm-houses and aviaries. Over forty churchyards and small greens have been laid out in various parts of the city, and the total area of parks and playgrounds now provided by the city for the health and amusement of its citizens amounts to over 1,000 acres.

  REF: 4177


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-spellow-mill-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Spellow Mill Spellow Lane, Walton, L.4 - 1843

 

  REF: 4176


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-spellow-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Spellow House Spellow Lane, Walton, L.4 - 1843

  Spellow House

In 1426 the Fazakerley family was awarded one third of the Walton Manor, due to the marriage of Robert Fazakerley to Ellen (Hellin) de Walton, daughter and heiress of Robert de Walton of Walton, This included 40 acres of land in Walton and Liverpool The land in Liverpool is today commemorated by Fazakerley Street and Spellow Place. , that had once belonged to a Thomas Spellow. In particular, the land included Spellow House and Spellow Mill.

Spellow House was close to the modern Spellow Lane The lane seems to mark an old border between Walton and Kirkdale.. The original Spellow House was built in the about 1270. The property consisted of the main house with a number of large outbuildings and a chapel. It also had numerous hiding places, for priests to hide in during the religious troubles of the 17th century.

  REF: 4175


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-the-collegiate-institution-shaw-street-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Collegiate Institution Shaw Street, Centre-North, L.3 - c1800s

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

For the supply of adequately equipped higher schools - schools to teach more than the barest rudiments - the town had to wait still longer. But the foundation of the Royal Institution in 1817 brought about the institution of one such school, of excellent quality, now defunct ; the establishment of the Mechanics' Institution in 1825, led after some years to the development of a second ; and, later still, the Liverpool Collegiate Institution gave birth to a whole group of valuable schools. So that Liverpool entered upon the next era in her history not badly equipped, though at a great disadvantage as compared with Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham, where sixteenth century grammar schools, like that which old John Crosse founded in Liverpool, had been allowed to survive and to enjoy the income of their original endowments.

  REF: 4166


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-scotland-place-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Scotland Place, Centre-North, L.3 - 1900

  Her Benny comes to life. Difficult to see but the boy in the centre and the one on the right both have their shoeshine brushes under their arms whilst the one on the left has no shoes.

  REF: 4161


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-old-poor-house-pool-lane-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Poor House Pool Lane, South Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4091


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-and-st-georges-church-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Church Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The days when the Castle had overawed and defied them were still too recent for them not to feel a thrill of delight in witnessing the demolition of the one time stronghold of their masters. Part of the site was later used for the erection of a fish-market ; and housewives chaffered over the price of herrings where armed men had once clanked and blustered.

On another part of the site a new church was built to accommodate the growing population. St. George's became the corporation church, with seats reserved for all members of the Council ; and all the details of the service were elaborately regulated by the Council. Now St. George's has in turn vanished, to make room for the memorial to Queen Victoria.

  REF: 4072


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-and-south-john-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, South John Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4071


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-war-memorial-st-johns-gardens-1906
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The War Memorial, St John's Gardens St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1906

 

  REF: 4005


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-the-sailors-home-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Sailors Home Paradise Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1850

 

  REF: 3988


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-the-bluecoat-school-school-lane-1917
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Bluecoat School School Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1917

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Far more important was the foundation of that most venerable of Liverpool charities, the Blue-coat Hospital, which owes its existence to the kindliness of the Rev. Robert Stythe, one of the first rectors of Liverpool, and its earliest endowments above all to the rare generosity of Bryan Blundell.

Blundell was a master mariner and part-owner of his own vessel ; he belonged to a family which had been settled in Liverpool since the time of Elizabeth. Deeply impressed by the plight of destitute orphans in the streets of his native town, he joined Mr. Stythe, in 1708, in opening a day school for fifty boys, and then set to work to collect money to establish a permanent building where they could be housed and fed. He left the sea to devote himself to this worthy hobby.

He himself gave one-tenth of his whole means, and collected 3,000 by personal begging. Prospering in business, he devoted throughout the remainder of his life a tithe of his income to aid the maintenance of the school ; and before he died in 1756, had the satisfaction of seeing his charity firmly established, and commanding the interest and support of all that was respectable in Liverpool.

  REF: 3972


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-the-bluecoat-school-school-lane-2-1917
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Bluecoat School School Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1917

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

THE BLUE COAT HOSPITAL, in School-lane, consists of an extensive range of brick buildings, with stone ornaments, having a spacious area in front, enclosed by iron railings. This institution was originally established in 1709, and consisted of a small building accommodating forty boys and ten girls, who received clothing and instruction gratuitously from the charity, but lived with their parents. In 1714, through the exertions of Bryan Blundell, Esq., a subscription was raised for providing an establishment in which the children should reside, and be entirely under the control of the institution. It was commenced in 1717, and completed in 1726. The object of this institution is stated in the inscriptions,

" Christianae Charitati promovendae inopique pueritiae, Ecclasiee Anglicanae principiis imbuendee Sacrum.

Anno Salutis, MDCCXVII.

Large additions have been subsequently made, nearly equal to the original building, the centre part of which is occupied by a large hall, over which is the Chapel. The wings are used as school-rooms, dormitories, and private apartments. 250 boys and 100 girls are boarded, clothed, and educated by this charity, the former of whom are instructed in reading, writing, arithmetic, grammar, geography, history, and occasionally geometry, and mensuration ; and the girls are taught sewing, knitting, and domestic duties, in addition to the usual subjects. The Madras system is pursued, and the scholars are trained according to the principles of the established church. The age for admission of boys is nine years, and eight if they are orphans, and for girls eight years, all remaining till they are fourteen years of age.

Service is performed every Sunday afternoon, at half past four, in the chapel of the institution, to which the public are admitted, on making a small donation at the door. One of the elder boys officiates as chaplain, and the whole of the children unite in singing and chanting the responses. About thirty of the boys and girls are then examined by another boy, on religious subjects, after which the service is concluded, and the pupils then proceed to the room below, where they have a substantial supper of bread and cheese, with a can of beer. The order, neatness, and ability of the scholars, reflect great credit on those under whose care they are placed. The charity has been very liberally supported, and many munificent donations have been made by benevolent individuals, some of whom have been educated in the institution.

  REF: 3971


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-the first-steamroller-1867
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The First Steamroller Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1867

  One of Thomas Aveling's first steam rollers was this 30 ton example which had a 500 gallon (2273 litre) water tank over the hind roll and was steered by a ships handwheel. Despite its hulk it is said that it could be turned in its own length.

This illustration from the 'Illustrated London News' of 12th October 1867 shows the roller working in Liverpool.

  REF: 3967


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-sweeting-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Sweeting Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1843

 

  REF: 3966


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-street-sweeper-1903
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Street Sweeper Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1903

  No wonder you could never find horse manure for the rhubarb.

  REF: 3965


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-pauls-church-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Pauls Church St Pauls Square, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1831

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

ST. PAUL'S CHURCH is situated in St. Paul's Square, and was consecrated in 1769. The building has a rustic basement, and is of a soft stone, which in many places has suffered decay from the action of the elements. On the west side is a bold Ionic portico, consisting of a pediment projecting considerably, and supported on four columns, approached by a broad flight of steps. There are similar porticoes of three-quarter columns, on the north and south sides.

The sides of the church are finished by a range of balustrades and plain vases. A handsome dome on an octangular base, crowned by a ball and cross, gives effect to the structure. This dome is supported internally by eight stone Ionic columns, reaching to the roof, which, from their heaviness, detract considerably from the appearance of the interior. The gallery, which is octangular, is placed behind these columns, and the altar is in an oval niche. This church will accommodate 1658 persons. In addition to the usual services, there is service in the Welsh language on Sunday evenings.

  REF: 3960


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-nicholas-place-1895
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Place, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1895

  In the days before the Liver Building.

  REF: 3959


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-johns-lane
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 -

 

  REF: 3955


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-johns-lane-1959
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1959

 

  REF: 3954


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-johns-gardens-view-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St John's Garden St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1950

 

  REF: 3953


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-johns-gardens-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St John's Garden St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1900

 

  REF: 3952


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-johns-gardens-2
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St John's Garden St Johns Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1900

 

  REF: 3951


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-james-cemetery-1850
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St James' Cemetery St James Mount, Centre-South, L.1 - 1850

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

In 1816, for example, a memorial was sent up by a number of leading townsmen suggesting that a ' spacious handsome public road with wide footpaths planted on each side with two rows of trees ' should be laid out, to run round the whole boundary of the old township. Such a scheme could have been carried out at very little expense at that time ; and how vastly it would have improved the aspect of the modern city! But the Council only curtly replied that ' the memorial cannot be entertained.'

The same memorialists, with as little success, asked that ' open pieces of land in the outskirts of the town (now covered with mean streets) should be appropriated to the amusements of the working classes.' This is the first proposal to institute parks or playgrounds ; but the need for such luxuries had not yet been felt. Indeed, one of the most striking features of the Liverpool of this date was the absence of any pleasant green places of public resort. There had been two Ladies' Walks, bordered with trees, where hooped and furbelowed dames paced, attended by their squires. One of these ran from Oldhall Street to the river, the other between Bold Street and Duke Street. Both had vanished before 1795, the one to make way for the Leeds and Liverpool canal, while the other was built upon. Our caustic critic in that year says there are ' no walks - commerce alone appears to engage the attention of the inhabitants.' The only places of public resort of this kind in the early nineteenth century were the little gardens on St. James' Mount, and a short parade on the sea-ward side of the George's Dock, much frequented by ladies.

  REF: 3948


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-james-cemetery-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St James' Cemetery St James Mount, Centre-South, L.1 - 1843

 

  REF: 3947


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-james-cemetery-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St James' Cemetery St James Mount, Centre-South, L.1 - 1831

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

THE Cemetery was consecrated in 1829, and this view gives an excellent idea of the neighbourhood as it was at that date. St. James's Mount has become additionally important since it has been selected as the site for the Liverpool Cathedral. The illustration shows Gambier Terrace and a portion of Hope Street, together with the Catacombs hewn in the sides of the road descending into the Cemetery.

The ancient quarry which existed here at an early date, was responsible for an accumulation of mounds of unsightly rubbish, and in 1767, when there was a bitter winter, and employment was difficult to obtain, the Corporation decided to relieve the distress by giving work to the unemployed, which work consisted in removing the rubbish and forming the district into a pleasure-ground. The object was accomplished, and a writer of that day describes the pleasure he had in ascending " Mount Sion " - the spot is so named on Perry's Map of 1769 - and enjoying the view over the River Mersey into Wirral, with the Welsh mountains forming an imposing background.

The tomb seen nearly in the centre of the engraving is that of William Huskisson, M.P. for Liverpool, who was killed at the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, and whose body was interred in the Cemetery soon after it was opened. The tomb consists of a small circular temple, and the marble statue of Huskisson was executed by John Gibson, R.A.

  REF: 3946


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-james-cemetery-2-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St James' Cemetery St James Mount, Centre-South, L.1 - 1831

 

  REF: 3945


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-james-cemetery-2-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St James' Cemetery St James Mount, Centre-South, L.1 - 1800

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

ST. JAMES' CEMETERY is situated between Upper Parliament-street, and Duke-street, along the lower side of Hope-street. It contains 44,000 square yards of ground, which was originally a stone quarry, but was converted into a cemetery, and consecrated on 12th January, 1829. The land was given for the purpose by the Corporation, and the sum of 20,000 was raised by subscription to carry into effect the designs of a committee of management. It has the appearance of a narrow dell, the west side of which is covered with rich foliage, and the east side is arranged in inclined planes or terraces, cut from the solid rock, which, being without wood, have a very bare appearance The catacombs or vaults, 105 in number, are hewn from the rock, and are entered from these terraces. The lower part of the cemetery is studded with graves tastefully arranged; and it is ornamented with serpentine walks, and shrubberies filling up the remainder ; causing this mournful habitation of the King of terrors to have little of the gloominess which generally characterizes the abodes of the dead.

The oratory is placed on the edge of a perpendicular rock, at the north west corner, and is reached from the lower part of the cemetery by a small tunnel cut through the rock, leading to the platform on which the chapel is situated. It is a fine specimen of the Grecian Doric architecture, and is a perfect model of a Greek Hypaethral temple. It has a portico at each end, consisting of a pediment supported by six fluted columns, and is lighted from the roof. The floor of the interior is of mosaic work, and there are several well-executed busts ranged round the building. Near the oratory, enclosed by a shrubbery, is the clergyman's house.

In the centre of the lower part of the cemetery is a circular mausoleum, similar to the lantern of Demosthenes, at Athens, consisting of a rustic basement, supporting ten three-quarter Corinthian columns, surmounted by a cornice and dome. It was erected by public subscription in memory of William Huskisson, Esq., M.P., who was unfortunately killed on the day of the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, on the 15th September, 1830, by a locomotive engine passing over his body. The light is admitted from near the roof, and falls with effect on the statue of the lamented Huskisson within. The figure is standing erect, habited in the Roman Toga, with the arms folded on the breast. The artist has happily caught an expression of countenance which the senator frequently exhibited, and has represented it with feeling and vigour. The mausoleum was erected by Messrs. Tomkinson and Son, and the statue was executed by our townsman, Mr. Gibson. Closer inspection of the figure may be procured by obtaining the key from the clerk, at the south end of the cemetery.

The number of interments at this cemetery during 1841, was 1074.

  REF: 3944


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-plateau-liverpool-1907
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1907

 

  REF: 3942


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-hall-1913
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St George's Hall St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1913

 

  REF: 3937


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-plateau-1881
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1881

 

  REF: 3935


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-hall-interior-1856
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St George's Hall St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1856

 

  REF: 3934


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-hall-and-st-johns-church-1855
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St George's Hall St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1855

 

  REF: 3933


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-hall-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St George's Hall St Georges Plateau, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

One enterprise of these years, not begun by the Council but warmly supported by it, and at a later date taken over by it, must not pass without mention. This was the proposal to erect a worthy public hall for the city, to be called St. George's Hall. A subscription of 25,000 was raised, and the council voted the old site of the Royal Infirmary, which had recently moved up to Pembroke Place. Here began, above the rather slovenly but not unpicturesque houses which then occupied both sides of Shaw's Brow (now William Brown Street), that noble building, one of the noblest in the modern world, which is to-day the supreme architectural boast of the city. That it should have been so amply planned was evidence that a new spirit of civic pride was rising in the city.

Its architect, Harvey Lonsdale Elmes, was a mere boy when his design was chosen, and he died before it was completed in 1854. But the choice of him is a remarkable proof of that good taste in architecture which Liverpool had long possessed, and of that good fortune in her public buildings which has never deserted the city.

  REF: 3932


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-st-georges-crescent-and-lord-street-2-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Crescent, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1900

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

ON November 2, 1825, just forty years after the date of the first Improvement Act of 1785, the Council resolved to apply for an Act for opening and widening Lord Street, Castle Ditch, Pool Lane, and other places, where the houses were old and had become dilapidated, whilst the streets were very narrow and unsuitable for the growing commerce and population of the town. The Act having been obtained, the houses of the Castle Ditch, opposite to St. George's Church, were demolished, and the building of St. George's Crescent was commenced in May of 1827.

The appearance of the town was greatly improved by the erection of these handsome buildings, and the great improvement was noticed. These very necessary improvements cost the town the large sum of 170,000. But it was money well spent, and a writer of the period says, " We congratulate the Town and Corporation of Liverpool on the happy issue of their recent exertions for its improvement, which have invested it with a grandeur and magnificence that will enable it to contest the palm of enterprise with the Metropolis itself."

  REF: 3931


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-springfield-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Springfield House Eaton Road, Knotty Ash, L14 - 1843

  As described in Wikipedia

Springfield Park is a 22-acre (8.9 ha) park in Liverpool, England.

It is located in the suburb of Knotty Ash, and lies to the north of Prescot Road. It is bounded on its north side by Alder Hey Children's Hospital, the park has a direct track that links to the Trans Pennine Trail. It also has a path that leads into Alder Veterinary Hospital's Car-park and then continues to Eaton Road.

Springfield was originally the estate and grounds of Springfield House, one of a number of wealthy properties on the outskirts of the city. After a succession of owners, the estate was acquired in 1907 by Liverpool City corporation as a public amenity. The house, which stood in the north-west corner of the park, and the lodge at the front entrance, are no longer standing.

  REF: 3928


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-sluice-house-1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Sluice House Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1800

 

  REF: 3926


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-silk-house-lane-1853
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Silk House Lane, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 3925


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-shipping-on-the-mersey-2-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Shipping on the Mersey Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1950

 

  REF: 3923


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-shipping-on-the-mersey-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Shipping on the Mersey Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1950

 

  REF: 3922


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-shipping-on-the-mersey-1882
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Shipping on the Mersey Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1882

  The rapid increase in the amount of Shipping belonging to Liverpool, has taken place almost entirely of late years, since the improvements in science have given a new stimulus to commercial enterprise. In 1540 Liverpool had only twelve vessels, of 177 tons burthen, and manned by seventy-five men, while in 1840, after a lapse of three centuries, she could boast of 15,998 vessels, of 2,445,708 tons, having entered the port during the short space of one year.

The number of vessels in the port at one time, exclusive of those discharging or loading in part at Runcorn, frequently amounts to upwards of 800.

The tonnage of Liverpool shipping, 1,768,426 in 1835, had risen to 5,728,504 in 1870 and 15,996,387 by 1905.

  REF: 3921


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-sessions-house-1887
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Sessions House William Brown Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1887

  Located next to the Walker Art Gallery, it opened in 1884.

  REF: 3919


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-seel-street-st-peters-school-evacuation-2-1939
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Peter's School Evacuation Seel Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1939

 

  REF: 3918


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-seel-street-st-peters-school-evacuation-1939
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Peter's School Evacuation Seel Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1939

  The school children being sent to live in 'safer' parts of the UK at the start of the Second World War. They mostly went to Wales.

  REF: 3917


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-school-lane-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: School Lane, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1843

 

  REF: 3916


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l1-salthouse-dock-1920
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Salthouse Dock, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1920

 

  REF: 3915



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