Old Photos of Liverpool, Maps and Old Liverpool Books

 Liverpool City Group
  past and present

 



Welcome to our extensive gallery of old images of Liverpool. Mostly, they have been collected from our extensive library of old Liverpool books, all of which have been out of circulation for more than a 100 years.

In order to make these very rare Liverpool books availability for you today, we have meticulously and faithfully reproduced them in epub eBook format so you can see and purchase them for your own collection in our shop

Results that match your search: 1199


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Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-queen-victoria-memorial
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Queen Victoria Memorial Derby Square, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1906

 

  REF: 4081


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-derby-square-queen-victoria-memorial-1906
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Queen Victoria Memorial Derby Square, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1906

  On the site of what used to be St George's Church and before that, the Liverpool Castle.

  REF: 4080


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-mersey-tunnel-plan-c1890
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Mersey Tunnel Plan , Centre-Town, L.2 - 1890

 

  REF: 4079


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-mersey-tunnel-1960
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Mersey Tunnel Old Haymarket, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1960

 

  REF: 4078


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-mersey-tunnel-1956
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Mersey Tunnel Old Haymarket, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1956

 

  REF: 4077


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-market-2-1890
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Market Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1890

 

  REF: 4076


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-market-1890
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Market Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1890

 

  REF: 4075


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-south-castle-street-derby-square-blitz-1941
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Bomb Damage WWII Lord Street, South Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1941

  At the junction of Lord Street, South Castle Street and Derby Square.

  REF: 4074


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-arcade-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Arcade Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1900

 

  REF: 4073


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-and-st-georges-church-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Church Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The days when the Castle had overawed and defied them were still too recent for them not to feel a thrill of delight in witnessing the demolition of the one time stronghold of their masters. Part of the site was later used for the erection of a fish-market ; and housewives chaffered over the price of herrings where armed men had once clanked and blustered.

On another part of the site a new church was built to accommodate the growing population. St. George's became the corporation church, with seats reserved for all members of the Council ; and all the details of the service were elaborately regulated by the Council. Now St. George's has in turn vanished, to make room for the memorial to Queen Victoria.

  REF: 4072


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-and-south-john-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, South John Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4071


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1950

 

  REF: 4070


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-1902
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1902

 

  REF: 4069


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-molyneuxs-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Molyneux's House Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4068


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-1826
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1826

 

  REF: 4067


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-lord-street-1798
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Lord Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1798

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The original seven streets, which, had held all the townsmen of Liverpool for more than four hundred years, were rapidly added to. The most energetic pioneer in this direction was Sir Edward Moore, who thus hoped to coin money out of his Liverpool lands. Before 1668 he had made Moor Street, parallel with Water Street, Fenwick Street (which he named after his father-in-law, Sir John Fenwick, of Northumberland), Fenwick's Alley, and Bridge's Alley, and was full of schemes for further improvements. Lord Molyneux, anxious to share in the prosperity, cut a street through the Castle orchard down to the Pool, and gave it his own name - afterwards abbreviated to Lord Street.

  REF: 4066


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-james-street-station-1940
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Railway Station James Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1940

 

  REF: 4065


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-james-street-bomb-damage-1941
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Bomb Damage WWII James Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1941

 

  REF: 4064


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-james-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: James Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Many of the streets in the centre of the town owe their names to the burgesses of the period. Alderman Preeson was the first man to build a house on the edge of the castle ditch, and is commemorated in Preeson's Row. Thomas Lancelot was a ' drunken idle fellow ' and scarcely deserves to be commemorated in the name of the street which was cut through his Hey or field; but Roger James, who gave his name to James Street, was ' a very honest man,' and had ' a good woman to his wife.' Sir Thomas Street owes its name to Sir Thomas Johnson, already named, who owned a croft on the site of the Municipal Buildings ; and ' a brave street,' now known as Hackins Hey, was cut through the Hey of John Hacking.

Some interesting information from the records of the castle:-
The south-western tower formed the keep, the most important building of the Castle, probably containing the residential quarters of the lord. From this tower a small chapel extended along the southern wall, as far as the cross-wall dividing the courtyard ; while the western wall, looking toward the river, was occupied by a large banqueting hall, with kitchens and a brew-house and bake-house.

A small postern gate on this side led to some steps into the moat, whence an underground passage ran, parallel with James Street, to the edge of the river ; by this provisions could be brought into the Castle, or the garrison could make its escape if necessary.

  REF: 4063


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-high-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The town proper consisted of the same little cluster of half-a-dozen streets which we have already noted as being laid out by King John. The central point was the High Street, sometimes called Juggler Street, perhaps because jongleurs or musicians took up their stand here on fair days. It ran north and south across the site of the Exchange Flags, and at each end of it was a town cross. Of the other streets, Chapel Street, Dale Street, and Castle Street already bore the names they bear to-day ; Water Street was known as Bank Street, Oldhall Street as Whitacre Street, and Tithebarn Street as Moor Street, being so called because it led to the Moor Green, a stretch of wet ground which lay near the upper end of the Pool.

Round this cluster of streets ran a wall, which left the river near the Old Hall, curved round Tithebarn Street to the lower end of Dale Street, and after following the line of the Pool, ran along the line of Lord Street and James Street to the river.

The streets were narrow, and, like those of other towns, very dirty. They must have been particularly bad before they were first paved in 1328. It was the duty of each burgess to keep the street clean in front of his own house, and it was one of the multifarious duties of the bailiffs to see that he did so. But if Liverpool was like other towns these duties were not very well fulfilled. The extreme dirt of any mediaeval town can scarcely be exaggerated ; and the entire absence of sanitation was one of the principal reasons for the terrible ravages of the plague.

We must not imagine very much traffic in these narrow and dirty streets. In the early mornings the swineherd would come along to collect the pigs from the crofts behind the cottages and drive them out upon the waste ; and on market days cattle would be driven along them, bellowing and jostling, to the market-place. But there would be little wheeled traffic, except that of a few springless country wains : there was no good carriage road out of Liverpool until the eighteenth century.

  REF: 4062


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-high-street-1797
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1797

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

JUGGLER STREET, afterwards named High Street, was once one of the main streets of Liverpool, the White Cross and the High Cross standing at either end. In the year 1654 a special resolution was passed by the Corporation, "that a lantern should be fixed at the High Cross, and likewise another at the White Cross, during the time of the dark Moon " - evidence of early public street lighting. Whilst referring to the subject of street lighting, it may be of interest to state that it was in January 1816 that the experiment of lighting Liverpool by gas was first tried in front of the Town Hall, and a contemporary writer says, " It is only necessary to observe the gas lamp at the coachmakers, in Dale Street, lately put forth, which gives nearly as much light as all the other lamps in the street."

This drawing shows the street as it existed in 1797, and is based on a water-colour drawing by J. Foster. The view is from the corner of Tithebarn Street towards Dale Street ; and where the row of buildings ends, in the left of the picture, is now about the site of Exchange Post Office and the offices of the Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance Co. Opposite to this corner a portion of the east front of the Town Hall is seen, with palings round it to facilitate the restoration of the building, after the fire of 1795. All the buildings on the west side of High Street, i.e. the right-hand side of this picture, were swept away to make a clear space or court for the Exchange.

  REF: 4061


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-from-the-town-hall
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: From the Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1900

 

  REF: 4060


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-fourth-town-hall-c1802
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Fourth Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1802

 

  REF: 4059


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-fewlers-court-chapel-street-2-1853
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Fewlers Court Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1853

 

  REF: 4058


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-and-nelsons-monument-c1882
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Nelson's Monument Exchange Building, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1882

 

  REF: 4057


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-buildings-1847
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Building, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1847

 

  REF: 4056


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-and-nelsons-monument-1836
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Nelson's Monument Exchange Building, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1836

 

  REF: 4055


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-newsroom-interior-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Newsroom Interior , Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4054


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-and-nelsons-monument-1830
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Nelson's Monument Exchange Building, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1830

 

  REF: 4053


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-exchange-buildings-1808
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Buildings , Centre-Town, L.2 - 1808

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

AT an early date the Town Hall was a mercantile Exchange, though business men seem to have preferred to assemble in the open air, in front of the hall, where the bulk of the business was transacted. But the traffic in Castle Street and Dale Street grew with the increasing trade of the port, so that business was subject to interruption, and it was decided to erect a new Exchange. Enfield states that in the year 1753 there were 3700 houses and 20,000 inhabitants, and that in 1760 there were 4200 houses and about 25,000 inhabitants, so that in seven years there was an increase of 500 houses and 5,000 inhabitants, a striking proof of the growing importance of Liverpool.

In April 1801 a sum of 80,000 was subscribed in a few hours for a new Exchange, the foundation stone being laid June 30, 1803, and the building opened to the public on March i, 1808. But the trade quickly outgrew the scope of the new building ; a new company was formed, the old building was taken down, and the present Exchange building erected, with Mr. T. M. Wyatt as architect, at a cost of 220,000, the new company having been formed in 1862.

  REF: 4052


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-the-mayors-house-2-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Mayor's House Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4051


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-the-mayors-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Mayor's House Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  The first recorded Mayor of Liverpool was William son of Adam of Liverpool, in 1351.

  REF: 4050


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-nags-head-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Nags Head Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4049


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4048


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-1840
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Royal Bank Building Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1840

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

THE ROYAL BANK, AND BUILDINGS. This extensive and magnificent range of buildings (situated at the west end of Dale-street,) was lately erected by the proprietors of the Royal Bank, from the plans of Samuel Rowland, Esq. The ground story is rusticated, and the centre part is lighted by a range of segment-headed windows. The wings, which are divided from the centre by two archways, are decorated with palladium windows of the Doric order. A facia and cornice finishes the ground story, and supports a range of lofty columns and pilasters of the Corinthian order. The centre of the upper part of the building consists of eight three-quarter columns, and two stories of windows and a string course; the wings, and the spaces over the arches, have two stories of palladium windows, three of the lower story of the Ionic order, with enriched friezes, decorated with elaborate and beautiful foliage. The entablature of the Corinthian order, in its full proportions and ornaments, is continued along the entire front of the building, and is surmounted by a balustrade, in the centre of which a pedestal supports the Royal Arms, giving an appropriate finish to the upper part of the edifice.

At the end of the enclosure is the Bank itself, which is of chaste and elegant design. Four well proportioned fluted Doric columns support a plain but bold cornice, on which rest four fluted Ionic columns, of more slender proportions, finished with a rich entablature and a pediment. The lintels of the side doors are handsomely ornamented by carved-work, and the sides and angles of the building are further improved by pilasters corresponding with the rest of the design.

The interior of the Bank, in elegance, almost surpasses the exterior. The ceiling is panelled with gilded mouldings, and supported by columns of a composition resembling marble.

The other parts of this extensive range of building are occupied by private offices,

  REF: 4047


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-2-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4046


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-dale-street-the-town-hall-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Dale Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4045


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-cotton-exchange
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Cotton Exchange Old Hall Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1900

 

  REF: 4044


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-st-nicholas-1882
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1882

 

  REF: 4043


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-our-lady-and-st-nicholas-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Our Lady and St Nicholas Church Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4042


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-st-nicholas-and-docks-1842
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church and the docks Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1842

 

  REF: 4041


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-st-nicholas-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

It is likely that King John's changes included also the erection of a water-mill on the little stream which ran into the Pool behind the modern Art Gallery, for this mill was in existence twenty years later. At this mill all the inhabitants of the town would be bound to have their corn ground. And it is probably to this date that we should attribute the erection of the first Liverpool church - the little Chapel of St. Mary of the Quay, which is known to have been in existence sixty years after this date. It stood by the water's edge, in what was later St. Nicholas' churchyard.

  REF: 4040


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-sessions-house-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Sessions House Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

SESSIONS HOUSE. The Assizes, Sessions, and other Courts, have been, since 1828, held in the building in Chapel-street, erected for that purpose. It is a plain edifice, of the Grecian style of architecture, extending 174 feet south from Chapel-street, having principal entrances at each end, together with others on the sides. At the south end, a winding stair leads from the vestibule to the room above, which is fitted up in a handsome manner for holding the assizes, with convenience for the judges, magistrates, barristers, jurors, &c., and about one-third of the space gradually rising like steps from the front, is allotted to spectators. The prisoner's dock is about the centre of the room, from which a staircase proceeds, communicating by a subterranean passage with the Bridewell opposite.

At the north end is a larger apartment, 611/2 by 39 feet, lighted from the roof, fitted up in a similar manner, and used as the Civil Court. In the centre of the building, between the two courts, are the magistrates', barristers', and other rooms. The expense of erection, amounting to 19,312 was defrayed by the corporation.

  REF: 4039


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-st-nicholas-1797
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1797

 

  REF: 4038


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-1797
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1797

 

  REF: 4037


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-chapel-street-1750
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1750

 

  REF: 4036


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-castle-street-bomb-damage-1941
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Bomb Damage WWII Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1941

 

  REF: 4035


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-castle-street-and-st-georges-crescent-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Castle Street, St Georges Crescent, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

ON November 2, 1825, just forty years after the date of the first Improvement Act of 1785, the Council resolved to apply for an Act for opening and widening Lord Street, Castle Ditch, Pool Lane, and other places, where the houses were old and had become dilapidated, whilst the streets were very narrow and unsuitable for the growing commerce and population of the town. The Act having been obtained, the houses of the Castle Ditch, opposite to St. George's Church, were demolished, and the building of St. George's Crescent was commenced in May of 1827.

The appearance of the town was greatly improved by the erection of these handsome buildings, and the great improvement will be noticed by referring to Plate xliii. These very necessary improvements cost the town the large sum of 170,000. But it was money well spent, and a writer of the period says, " We congratulate the Town and Corporation of Liverpool on the happy issue of their recent exertions for its improvement, which have invested it with a grandeur and magnificence that will enable it to contest the palm of enterprise with the Metropolis itself."

  REF: 4034


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-castle-street-and-town-hall-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1820

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

THE restoration and enlargement of the third Town Hall occupied a quarter of a century, and were carried out with great care and good judgment. The main walls of the old building were retained, and the additions, with the exception of the dome, were executed in the same style, under the superintendence of the London architect, James Wyatt. The dome and cupola, lighted with windows, and surmounted by a figure of Britannia - measuring 12 feet high, executed by the celebrated sculptor Richard Westmacott, R.A., and costing 400 - were completed in the year 1802 ; about the same time, the four statues, representing the four seasons, also by Westmacott, which still surmount the north facade, were placed in position at a cost of 500. The projecting portico and arcade at the front were finished in 1811, and the whole building was regarded as finished in the year 1820.

On account of its increased size and altered appearance it is generally spoken of as the fourth Town Hall, and with the exception of a few minor alterations which have been carried out from time to time, the building is the same externally now as it was then.

It is one of Liverpool's noblest and most elegant buildings, in the very centre of Liverpool's vast commercial activities ; and the pride which it inspired in our ancestors still lives in the veneration with which it is regarded by the citizens to-day.

  REF: 4033


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-castle-street-1786
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1786

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The citizens of Liverpool owe reverence to the worst king who ever ruled over England, for King John was the founder and creator of the city. By royal fiat, for his own purposes, he turned the obscure hamlet at which we have been looking into a thriving little borough, and endowed it with substantial privileges.

John was anxious to complete the conquest of Ireland, which had begun in his father's reign ; and for this purpose he wished to use the men and supplies of his Lancashire lands. But he had no convenient port of embarkation. There was no port at all in Lancashire, and Chester was too much under the control of its powerful and independent earl. In the year 1206 John travelled through Lancashire from north to south, and it was probably on this journey that his attention was caught by the convenient sheltered creek of Liverpool. In the next year he made the exchange with Henry Fitzwarin which has been already recorded ; and five days after the exchange was completed, on August 28, 1207, he issued letters patent inviting settlers to come to his new port, and promising them liberal privileges if they came. It is this invitation which is commonly, though inaccurately, described as King John's charter ; and with it began the existence of Liverpool as a borough and trading centre.

The preparations which John, or his agents, had made for the new population may be very briefly described. They seem to have laid out seven main streets in the form of a cross ; the High Street, running across the modern Exchange Flags ; the streets afterwards known as Castle Street and Old Hall Street, continuing it to south and north ; and, at right angles to these, two streets on the lines of the modern Chapel Street and Water Street, running down to the water's edge, and two more on the lines of the modern Dale Street and Tithebarn Street, running inland. Along these streets they carved out a number of building plots, with room for long crofts or gardens behind. These were known as burgages, and their rent was one shilling per annum. At the end of the century there were one hundred and sixty-eight of these burgages, but the number was probably not so large to begin with. John also appears to have enclosed some of the waste land on the north of his new town, in order to provide allotments of arable land for his tenants, each of whom was given, without extra rent, strips of land in the fields at the rate of rather more than two acres for each burgage.

  REF: 4032



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