Old Photos of Liverpool, Maps and Old Liverpool Books

 Liverpool City Group
  past and present

 



Welcome to our extensive gallery of old images of Liverpool. Mostly, they have been collected from our extensive library of old Liverpool books, all of which have been out of circulation for more than a 100 years.

In order to make these very rare Liverpool books availability for you today, we have meticulously and faithfully reproduced them in epub eBook format so you can see and purchase them for your own collection in our shop

Results that match your search: 1199


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Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-2-1937
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Coronation Celebrations High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1937

 

  REF: 4131


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-the-kings-visit-1913
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and the King's Visit Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1913

 

  REF: 4130


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-and-castle-street-c1910
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1910

 

  REF: 4129


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-and-castle-street-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1900

 

  REF: 4128


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tower-buildings-demolition-1907
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Tower Buildings Demolition Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1907

  The buildings that replaced the tower, now being demolished.

  REF: 4127


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-interior-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Interior Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4126


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-courtyard-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Courtyard Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4125


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-5-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4124


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-3-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4123


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-2-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4122


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4121


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-the-tower-1406
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1406

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Desiring a link between his Lancashire lands and his new dominion, and a base for men and supplies, Sir John Stanley, in 1406, obtained leave to fortify a house of stone and lime in Liverpool. This house was the Liverpool Tower, which remained standing at the bottom of Water Street until 1819, and is to-day represented by Tower Buildings.

The erection of the Tower marks the beginning of the intimate connexion of the family of Lord Derby with Liverpool, a connexion which has now been one of the outstanding features of the life of the borough for exactly five hundred years. Liverpool thus became the official point of contact between England and the Isle of Man, and this may have been good for trade. But the erection of a second feudal stronghold in the town must have been regarded with some disquietude by the burgesses. They must have felt somewhat nervous as to the probable behaviour of these new and embarrassing neighbours.

  REF: 4120


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tower-plan-1406
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tower Plans Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1406

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

THE date of the Tower of Liverpool as a fortified building is generally agreed to be 1406. The land upon which it stood belonged to the de Knowsley family, a branch of the de Lathom family in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and possibly a house stood upon part of the land before it was inherited by Isabel Lathom, sister of Sir Thomas Lathom, and wife of Sir John Stanley, about the year 1390. But as a fortified house the earliest record of the Tower is in the licence granted to Sir John Stanley in 1406, to embattle his house of stone and lime. The possession of the property and the building of the Tower mark the beginning of the intimate connection which the House of Stanley has ever since held with Liverpool.

The Tower was used by the Stanleys as a residence, and remained in their possession until the year 1651, when the treason of James, seventh Earl of Derby (or his loyalty, whichever way the matter is viewed) caused all his English estates to be forfeited. But in 1665 the Tower was again the property of the Derby family ; and in 1682 the ninth Earl of Derby leased it to Thomas Clayton, a Liverpool merchant, and formerly Mayor of the town.

In 1702 the Tower was inherited by Henrietta, daughter of the ninth Earl of Derby and wife of Lord Ashburnham ; and by them it was sold for £1140 to Richard Clayton of Adlington, in whose family it remained until the year 1775, when it was sold to the Corporation of Liverpool for £905. In the year 1819 the building was pulled down in order that Water Street might be widened, and thus was the oldest building in Liverpool sacrificed to the appeal of commerce and the exigencies of the local exchequer. In the year 1648 the daughters of the Earl of Derby were imprisoned in the Tower, and in the year 1651 Lord Molyneux was imprisoned there.

The Earls of Derby gave grand social entertainments in the Tower, and after they ceased to use it as a place of occasional residence it was leased in 1735 to John Earle, an ancestor of the present family of Earles of Liverpool. The building was used as the town gaol ; while the upper rooms were used as assembly rooms for dancing, cards, and other entertainments, until the third Liverpool Town Hall was built, when the locale of those functions was transferred thither.

  REF: 4119


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tithebarn-street-railway-station-1850
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Railway Station Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1850

 

  REF: 4118


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tithebarn-street-the-tithe-barn-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Tithe Barn Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Within the town, too, things were improving. In 1524 Sir William Molyneux rented a patch of waste land near the Moor Green from the burgesses, as a site for a new barn to hold the tithes of Walton, which had come into his possession. It was this barn which gave its name to Tithebarn Street

Its actual position was on the corner with Cheapside.

  REF: 4117


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tithebarn-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4116


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-1848
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1848

 

  REF: 4115


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-looking-south-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall looking south Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4114


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-2-high-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4113


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-interior-of-ballroom-high-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Ballroom High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4112


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-castle-street-1830
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1830

 

  REF: 4111


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-1808
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1808

 

  REF: 4110


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-and-nelsons-monument-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Nelson's Monument High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4109


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4108


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-2-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4107


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-south-west-view-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4106


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-burning-high-street-2-1795
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Burning High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1795

 

  REF: 4105


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-burning-high-street-1795
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Burning High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1795

  As described in "Recollections of Old Liverpool" in the year 1863

I don’t believe there is another man in Liverpool alive at this time who saw the Town Hall on fire in 1795. I saw it, I may say, almost break out, for I was in Castle-street in ten minutes after the alarm had spread through the town, and that was soon done, for Liverpool was not of the extent it is now. I believe half the inhabitants turned out into the streets to witness that awful sight, although it was at five o’clock on a frosty Sunday morning in January. For my part, I was aroused by the continuous springing of rattles by the watchmen, and the rushing sounds of people running along the street. I was soon out of bed and joined the throng of people who were hurrying to the scene of disaster.

When I arrived there, a crowd had already assembled. Castle-street was then very narrow. It was quite choked up with people. Dale-street was beginning to be crowded while High-street and Water-street were quite impassable. From the windows of all the houses the terrified inmates were to be observed en dishabille, and the large inn in Water-street, the Talbot, which was nearly opposite the Town Hall, had people looking out at every window.

The smoke first made its appearance at the lower windows of the Town Hall. The doors having been forced, a party of men got into the interior of the building, and brought out for safety the books of the various departments, and some of the town’s officers having arrived, something like system took the place of the dreadful confusion which prevailed. The town records, the treasurer’s accounts, and the muniments, etc., were safely removed to a house at the end of High-street. I helped to keep order. Assisted by many other volunteers for the work we formed a lane so that there should be no impediment to a quick removal of anything that was portable. The fire was first discovered about five o’clock in the morning by the watchman on duty in the street. They were dull old fellows, those watchmen, and of but little use, for in calling the hour nine times out of ten they made a mistake. The thieves laughed them to scorn. When the watchman saw smoke issuing from the windows he gave the alarm without delay. The fire soon showed itself, when it had once got ahead. When the new Exchange was erected, after the former one had been taken down in 1748, somebody persuaded the authorities to have the woodwork and timber of the new building steeped in a composition of rosin and turpentine, so as to make the wood more durable. It may therefore be readily imagined how inflammable such a composition would make the wood, and how fiercely it burned when once ignited. There had been a perceptible odour of some sort experienced in the Exchange building for some days, and this was afterwards discovered to have arisen from the woodwork under the council-chamber having taken fire through a flue communicating from the Loan-office; and there is no doubt it had been smouldering for days before it actually made its appearance.

It could not have been ten minutes after I arrived on the spot before the flames burst out in all their fury. It was an awfully grand sight. It was yet dark. What with the rushing and pushing of the anxious crowd, the roaring of the fierce flames, and the calling of distracted people, it was an event and scene never to be forgotten. The building was soon all in a blaze, and nothing on earth could have stopped that frightful conflagration. It was a mercy it was a calm frosty morning or the houses in the four streets adjacent must have caught the flame. From the age of these houses, the quantity of timber in them, the narrowness of the streets, and the absence of a copious supply of water, I am sure Liverpool would have been half consumed if a wind had sprung up.

I thought the building looked like a great funeral pile as the flames roared out on all sides. It was a grand, yet dreadful sight. The whole of Castle-street was occupied by people, although, from the position of the Exchange, a full front view could not be obtained, it being almost parallel with the west side of Castle-street. The best view of it was where I stood at the top of Dale-street, by Moss’s bank. The dome, being constructed of wood, soon took fire, was burnt, and fell in. We had not then as now powerful engines, long reels of hose, and bands of active men well trained to their arduous and dangerous duties, still, everybody did his best and seemed desirous of doing something. We did that something with a will, but without much order, system, or discretion.

The engines in use were not powerful, and the supply of water was not only tardy but scanty, as you may believe when I tell you it had to be brought from the town wells, the Dye-house Well in Greetham-street, the Old Fall Well in Rose-street (where Alderman’s Bennett’s ironwork warehouse stands, near the corner of Rose-street-by the way, Rose-street was called after Mr. Rose, who lived in the house next the Stork Hotel), and the wells on Shaw’s-brow; indeed, every possible source where water could be obtained, was put in requisition. The inhabitants allowed the rain-water to be taken from their water-butts in the vicinity to such liberal extent that I verily believe there was not a drop of rain-water to be got for love or money when that eventful day was out.

Staid housewives for many a day after complained of the dirt the trampling of feet had made in their lobbies and yards, and deplored the loss of their stores of soft-water. At that time water was precious, every drop that could be obtained was saved, garnered, and carefully kept. Every drop of hard-water we consumed had to be brought to our doors and paid for by the "Hessian" or bucket. The water-carts were old butts upon wheels, drawn by sorry horses and driven by fat old creatures, half men half women in their attire and manners. The buckets were made of leather and the water was sold at a halfpenny per Hessian. They were so called, I believe, from their fancied resemblance to the Hessian boots. You may judge how inadequate a supply of water we had when our wants were dependent upon such aid.

The water-carts came rumbling and tumbling along the streets, in many cases losing one-half of their loads by the unusual speed at which they were driven and the awkwardness of their drivers. Water was also carted from the river, and I helped with others to push the carts up Water-street. The steep ascent of this street in its badly paved condition made this work extremely laborious. But everybody helped and did what they could, and those who did nothing made up for deeds by words and shouted and bawled and told the others what they ought to do.

Fortunately, only one life was lost, that of a fool-hardy young man who would press forward to see the fire better-he rushed up to the High-street door and a piece of timber fell on him. The surging of the crowd caused several persons to be struck down and trampled upon. I saved one woman’s life by beating off the people who would have crushed her. By twelve o’clock the fire had slackened considerably, and by the evening it was to all appearance subdued. But the fire in the interior remained smouldering for some time afterwards.

  REF: 4104


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-1786
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1786

  During the widening of Castle street.

  REF: 4103


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-exchange-1887
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Buildings Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1887

 

  REF: 4102


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-exchange-2-1887
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Buildings Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1887

  Note to diary - Must remember to open a hat shop.

  REF: 4101


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-exchange-buildings-grand-ball-1868
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Exchange Buildings Grand Ball Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1868

 

  REF: 4100


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-exchange-buildings-1830
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Buildings Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1830

 

  REF: 4099


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-exchange-c1790
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Exchange , Centre-Town, L.2 - 1790

 

  REF: 4098


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-st-nicholas-church-and-tower-buildings-2-c1800s
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church and Tower Buildings Pier Head, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1800

 

  REF: 4097


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-st-nicholas-church-and-chapel-street-c1800s
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Nicholas Church Chapel Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4096


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-snowballing-at-the-exchange-1854
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Exchange Buildings Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1854

 

  REF: 4095


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-red-cross-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Red Cross Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4094


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-red-cross-street-2-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Red Cross Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4093


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-pool-lane-(south-castle-street)-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Pool Lane, South Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4092


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-old-poor-house-pool-lane-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Poor House Pool Lane, South Castle Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4091


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-old-fort-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Fort Liverpool, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The one redeeming feature of these depressing years was the vigour, courage, and patriotism with which Liverpool threw herself into the struggle, especially after the French war had been added to the American. A large round fort was raised on the north shore, where the Prince's dock now is, with barracks for a force of four or five hundred troops. In addition, batteries were raised at the dock mouths.

The Corporation undertook in 1778 two-thirds of the cost of raising and fitting out a regiment of regular troops, to be called the Liverpool Blues, and when the muster was called the regiment numbered 1,100 men. Its senior officers were borrowed from the regular army, but the subalterns were all young Liverpool men.

  REF: 4090


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-old-exchange-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Exchange Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Though the Town Council made no attempt to alleviate or remove the conditions of sordid misery in which so many of the inhabitants of the town dwelt, they paid a good deal of attention during this period to the beautifying of the central streets and public buildings. The Town Hall, gutted by a fire on the 18th of January, 1795, was enlarged and very successfully reconstructed. Behind it the huddled and unsavoury alleys which occupied the site of the modern exchange, were demolished ; and in the open space thus created there was erected a splendid monument to Lord Nelson, the result of a subscription that followed Trafalgar, and the first public monument erected in Liverpool.

Round it there rose a spacious quadrangular exchange, which was opened in 1808, but served the needs of the town's commerce only for fifty years, being replaced in 1858 by the modern exchange.

  REF: 4089


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-moor-street-tithebarn-street-old-mansion-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Mansion Moor Street, Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4088


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-moor-street-tithebarn-street-custom-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Old Custom House Moor Street, Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  Liverpool's second Custom House.

  REF: 4087


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-moor-street-tithebarn-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Moor Street, Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4086


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-moor-street-tithebarn-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Moor Street, Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

MOOR, or Moore Street, was the ancient name of Tithebarn Street, so called probably from the fact that it led to some rough land known as the Moor.

The change of name took place some time after the year 1524, when Sir William Molyneux of Sefton (who had bought the living and tithes of the Parish of Walton from the Abbey of Shrewsbury in Edward IV's reign) erected in this street a barn, upon a piece of land lying near the Moore Green. The barn was used to store the tithes received in Liverpool from all places in the neighbourhood which paid tithe to the Molyneuxes, and quite naturally it became general to refer to the street as the tithe-barn street, and the original name was gradually forgotten.

The barn stood on the south side of Tithebarn Street, near the corner of Dig Lane, now called Cheapside. It eventually passed out of the possession of the Molyneux family, and was converted into shops, the main structure and the old oak roof remaining, the ground behind being utilized as a bowling-green. A portion of the building was pulled down some time after the year 1820 in order to widen the street, which was very narrow and tortuous, but the remaining portion was not removed for many years afterwards.

  REF: 4085


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-old-st-georges-church-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Georges Church Derby Square, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  On the site that used to be the Liverpool Castle.

  REF: 4084


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-queen-victoria-memorial-lord-street-harrington-street-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Queen Victoria Memorial Lord Street, Harrington Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1950

 

  REF: 4083


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-queen-victoria-memorial-and-national-bank
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Queen Victoria Memorial and National Bank Derby Square, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1906

 

  REF: 4082



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