Old Photos of Liverpool, Maps and Old Liverpool Books

 Liverpool City Group
  past and present

 



Welcome to our extensive gallery of old images of Liverpool. Mostly, they have been collected from our extensive library of old Liverpool books, all of which have been out of circulation for more than a 100 years.

In order to make these very rare Liverpool books availability for you today, we have meticulously and faithfully reproduced them in epub eBook format so you can see and purchase them for your own collection in our shop

Results that match your search: 1199


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Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-walton-church-road-williamson-district-nurses-home-1909
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Williamson District Nurses Home Church Road, Walton, L.4 - 1909

 

  REF: 4181


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-walton-american-tram-car-1905
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: American Tram Car , Walton, L.4 - 1905

 

  REF: 4180


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-walton-academy-1787
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Walton Academy , Walton, L.4 - 1787

  Reputedly one of the first schools in the area.

  REF: 4179


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-townsend-mill-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Townsend Mill Lime Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

As the townsmen were mainly engaged in agriculture, and as it was principally agricultural produce which was brought in to the market, milling was naturally also an active business. The old water mill on the mill dam behind the modern Art Gallery had vanished by this time ; but it had been replaced by two great windmills, the more important of which, known as Eastham mill, stood just beside the old water-mill, while the other, known as Townsend mill, was within a stone's throw of it, on the site of the modern Wellington Column, opposite to St. George's Hall. At one or other of these two mills every inhabitant of Liverpool was bound to grind his corn.

The importance of the mills is indicated by the fact that they were worked by the two leading families of the town. These were the Liverpool family and the Moore family.

  REF: 4178


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-stanley-park-1910
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Stanley Park , Walton, L.4 - 1910

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

In 1835 it would have been easy for the Town Council at comparatively small expense to surround the town, as it then was, with a continuous ring of parks. The Town Council was too much engrossed with other questions, and too eager for economy. The first fifteen years of the reformed Council were very fully occupied with urgent reforms : it was these years which produced the great building acts, the first clearance of the slums, the initiation of the new water supply, and the origination of the public library, and amid all these activities it is perhaps not surprising that parks were forgotten. In 1848, indeed, the Newsham estate was purchased with a view to turning it into a public park, but nothing was done. The truth is that in the middle years of the century a distinct slackening is noticeable in the zeal for public improvement. The town was flourishing ; everybody was engrossed in the building up of fortunes ; and as there was no considerable body of opinion to which these things were of secondary interest, the Council was loth to undertake new and costly enterprises.

But in 1868 the spirit of improvement revived again, and the first question taken in hand was the provision of parks. In that year parliamentary powers were obtained for the creation of no less than three great public pleasure-grounds - Sefton, Newsham and Stanley Parks, costing in all 670,000. From that time onwards no good opportunity of obtaining fresh breathing-spaces has been neglected, the latest and most beautiful of these acquisitions being that of Calderstones Park. Private munificence has come to the aid of public funds, both in the provision of land (as in the case of the princely gift of Wavertree Playground in 1895, or of Bowring Park in 1906) or in the equipment of the parks with palm-houses and aviaries. Over forty churchyards and small greens have been laid out in various parts of the city, and the total area of parks and playgrounds now provided by the city for the health and amusement of its citizens amounts to over 1,000 acres.

  REF: 4177


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-spellow-mill-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Spellow Mill Spellow Lane, Walton, L.4 - 1843

 

  REF: 4176


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-spellow-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Spellow House Spellow Lane, Walton, L.4 - 1843

  Spellow House

In 1426 the Fazakerley family was awarded one third of the Walton Manor, due to the marriage of Robert Fazakerley to Ellen (Hellin) de Walton, daughter and heiress of Robert de Walton of Walton, This included 40 acres of land in Walton and Liverpool The land in Liverpool is today commemorated by Fazakerley Street and Spellow Place. , that had once belonged to a Thomas Spellow. In particular, the land included Spellow House and Spellow Mill.

Spellow House was close to the modern Spellow Lane The lane seems to mark an old border between Walton and Kirkdale.. The original Spellow House was built in the about 1270. The property consisted of the main house with a number of large outbuildings and a chapel. It also had numerous hiding places, for priests to hide in during the religious troubles of the 17th century.

  REF: 4175


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-queens-drive-walton-chief-vets-house-1905
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Chief Vets House Queens Drive, Walton, L.4 - 1905

 

  REF: 4174


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-liverpool-football-club-anfield-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Liverpool Football Club Anfield Road, Anfield, L.4 - 1900

 

  REF: 4173


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-wellington-column-1913
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Wellington Column Commutation Row, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1913

 

  REF: 4172


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-vandries-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Vandries House Liverpool, Centre-North, L.3 - 1843

 

  REF: 4171


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-university-of-liverpool-etching-c1880
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1880

 

  REF: 4170


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-union-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Union Street, Centre-North, L.3 - 1843

 

  REF: 4169


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-the-wellington-rooms-mount-pleasant-1839
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Wellington Rooms Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1839

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

THE WELLINGTON ROOMS were erected in 1815, by subscription, according to the design of Mr. Edmund Aikin, of London, for the purpose of holding public assemblies, balls, &c. The building is situated at the corner of Mount Pleasant and Great Orford-street, and it has a stone front without windows.

The centre has a circular portico supported by four Corinthian columns. The interior is tastefully arranged, and contains a ball-room, 80 feet by 37 feet ; a card-room 41 feet by 25 feet; a supper-room 50 feet by 25 feet, and other apartments.

  REF: 4168


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-the-university-college-1892
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The University College Brownlow Street, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1892

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The dream of planting in the midst of the shops and warehouses of a great city a university of a new type was one which could scarcely have been entertained until the years when the boldest schemes, and the highest ideals of what was possible and desirable for Liverpool, had begun to be entertained. When, after the Education Act of 1870, England began to be dotted with timid institutions then called University Colleges, a few enlightened men began to urge that Liverpool also should take the same course.

A handful of doctors, struggling to maintain the School of Medicine which had existed since 1834, one or two scholars, like Charles Beard, who had drifted into the not very congenial surroundings of a great commercial centre, and a few enthusiasts for scientific training as an equipment for practical life - these were the pioneers of the movement. But they found themselves faced by many obstacles. When they tried to arouse interest among the great merchants of the town, they found, as one of them has testified, that most of them were interested only in two things - money-making and good living ; while others, forming their ideas of a university upon the lawns and ancient buildings of Oxford, laughed at the idea of turning a trading town into the seat of a university. Some, who might otherwise have thrown themselves into the movement, were diverted from it by the synchronous movement for the establishment of the bishopric.

Yet gradually the idea gained ground, helped forward not a little by the inspiring dream of what such a civic university might be, which was put forward by the great scholar. Bishop Lightfoot, himself once a Liverpool boy ; and helped still more by the whole hearted enthusiasm with which that noble philanthropist, William Rathbone, threw himself into the work of collecting funds. So at length the scheme was formally launched at a town's meeting in 1879; the corporation began its munificent support by granting a site ; 50,000 were raised by subscription ; and in January, 1882, the University College was opened, in a disused lunatic asylum, in the midst of a slum district.

  REF: 4167


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-the-collegiate-institution-shaw-street-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Collegiate Institution Shaw Street, Centre-North, L.3 - c1800s

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

For the supply of adequately equipped higher schools - schools to teach more than the barest rudiments - the town had to wait still longer. But the foundation of the Royal Institution in 1817 brought about the institution of one such school, of excellent quality, now defunct ; the establishment of the Mechanics' Institution in 1825, led after some years to the development of a second ; and, later still, the Liverpool Collegiate Institution gave birth to a whole group of valuable schools. So that Liverpool entered upon the next era in her history not badly equipped, though at a great disadvantage as compared with Manchester, Leeds and Birmingham, where sixteenth century grammar schools, like that which old John Crosse founded in Liverpool, had been allowed to survive and to enjoy the income of their original endowments.

  REF: 4166


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-st-stephens-church-byrom-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Stephen's Church Byrom Street, Centre-North, L.3 - 1843

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

ST. STEPHEN'S CHURCH is a small cemented building in Byrom-street, with seats for 497 persons. It was licensed as a Protestant dissenters' meeting-house of the Baptist denomination in 1722, and afterwards consecrated as a Church.

  REF: 4165


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-stanley-dock-gates-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Dock Gates Regent Road, Centre-North, L.3 - 1800

 

  REF: 4164


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-st-andrews-gardens-trowbridge-street-1935
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: St Andrew's Gardens Model Trowbridge Street, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1935

  Looks like the Mayor is pointing out all the grass, shrubs and flowers in an English country garden!

  REF: 4163


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-site-of-st-silas-pembroke-place-1943
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Bomb Damage WWII - The site of St Silas Church Pembroke Place, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1943

 

  REF: 4162


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-scotland-place-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Scotland Place, Centre-North, L.3 - 1900

  Her Benny comes to life. Difficult to see but the boy in the centre and the one on the right both have their shoeshine brushes under their arms whilst the one on the left has no shoes.

  REF: 4161


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-royal-infirmary-brownlow-street-1911
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Royal Infirmary Brownlow Hill, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1911

 

  REF: 4160


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-notre-dame-mount-pleasant-serpentine-walk-c1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Notre Dame Serpentine Walk Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1900

 

  REF: 4159


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-william-roscoe-birthplace-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: William Roscoe Birthplace Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Born in 1753, the son of an innkeeper in Mount Pleasant, Roscoe's formal education lasted only till the age of twelve, when he returned to work in his father's market garden, and, later, to earn his livelihood in the arid atmosphere of a lawyer's office. Yet by the time he was twenty he had acquired a reading knowledge of Latin, French and Italian, was revelling in the history and literature of fifteenth century Italy, had taught himself to etch, and was studying with eagerness the history of the fine arts. Already he had been captivated by that enthusiasm for Florence and its great citizen-prince, Lorenzo de Medici, which subsequently led him to write the life of his hero, and to win the applause of Europe.

Roscoe's historical writings have not stood the test of time ; but one aspect of them retains an inspiring interest. In this writer the historian and the citizen are never dissociated. What drew him to Florence and Lorenzo was that in Florence he saw a great commercial city, as great in its own age as Liverpool in this, but a city which was inspired by the love of beauty, which was the nurse of poets and scholars and artists ; a city in which it was an inspiration to live, whose very atmosphere stimulated and inspired the finest aspirations of its citizens ; a city which for that reason, and not at all because of the magnitude of its commerce, has earned an imperishable fame. Poignant as was the contrast between Florence and Liverpool, it gave a zest at once to Roscoe's historical studies and to his political activities. He found in Florence at once refreshment from the brutal materialism of his native town, and inspiration for the attempt to breathe into it a new spirit.

  REF: 4158


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-bowling-green-house-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: William Roscoe Birthplace Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1843

 

  REF: 4157


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-william-roscoe-birthplace-1753
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: William Roscoe Birthplace Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1753

  As described in "Bygone Liverpool" in the year 1913

THE inn was situated in Mount Pleasant in days when Mount Pleasant stood outside the town, and was an eminence where one might linger to enjoy the prospect, or rest on the farm gates to watch the dusty carts descend into the town.

At the summit of the hill, near the corner of the road, stood this quaint hostelry, which presents few architectural attractions, and certainly would not find a place here if it had not been the birthplace of one of Liverpool's most eminent citizens, and of one who was distinguished on every side of life he touched - as a husband, father, scholar, poet, citizen, and lover of fine arts. The inn was much frequented, not only for the refreshment it afforded, but for the recreation of the bowling-green and the attractiveness of its large garden, for William Roscoe's father eked out his small income by the cultivation of an extensive market garden. William Roscoe, in a letter to a friend, alludes to the drawing here reproduced, and says, " I was born on the 8th day of March 1753, at the Old Bowling-Green House on Mount Pleasant, one of the oldest houses yet standing in Liverpool, and of which an excellent drawing by that rising artist, Austin, is engraved."

This is not the place to attempt a full account of William Roscoe's long and useful life, nor even to print a list of all his published works. Briefly stated, he helped his father in the market garden until 1769, after which he was articled to John Eyes, Jun., and then to Peter Ellames, attorneys in Liverpool, being admitted an attorney in 1774. In 1777 he published "Mount Pleasant: a Descriptive Poem," and in 1793 John MacCreery began to print the "Life of Lorenzo de Medici," which was published in Liverpool in 1795. The following year he retired from his profession and purchased Allerton Hall. He entered the Bank of Messrs. William Clarke and Sons in the year 1800 as partner, and in October 1806 was elected Member of Parliament for his native town. In politics he was a Whig, and was strongly in favour of the abolition of slavery. In 1816 Roscoe's bank suspended payment, and to satisfy in part the claims he sold his books and his collection of prints and pictures. A selection of his books was purchased by friends, and now forms a portion of the Roscoe Collection in the Athenaeum Library.

The " Life and Pontificate of Leo the Tenth " was published in Liverpool in 1805. The author died at his house in Lodge Lane on June 30, 1831, and was buried in the burial-ground attached to the Unitarian Chapel, Renshaw Street, Liverpool.

  REF: 4156


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-botanic-gardens-c1907
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Botanic Gardens Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1907

 

  REF: 4155


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-botanic-gardens-c1803
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Botanic Gardens Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1803

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

Of Roscoe's manifold political interests and work, this is no place to tell. But something must be said of the group of new institutions for the creation of an intellectual life in Liverpool which were carried out by him and his group of friends, and for which his historical studies provided much of the inspiration. The various attempts to found an organisation for the promotion of the fine arts always had Roscoe for their principal supporter. He and his friends were the creators of the Athenaeum, a library for scholars, opened in 1799.

The Botanic Gardens, at first established at the top of Mount Pleasant, owed their existence to him ; they were the first institution for the encouragement of scientific studies established in Liverpool.

  REF: 4154


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-mount-pleasant-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Mount Pleasant, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

In 1725 John Chadwick drew up the first surveyed map of Liverpool, for which he was rewarded by a grant of 6 from the Town Council. This map shows thirty-seven streets in existence, and presents a marked contrast to the map of fifty years before, which might serve for almost any period in Liverpool history before the eighteenth century.

The Pool has vanished, and the Old Dock (on the site of the modern Custom-house*) has taken its place. But there is as yet little building south of the old line of the Pool ; while to the north the limits of the house-covered area still extend only to the Old Hall.

George Perry's map of 1769 shows a remarkable growth. Church Street and Ranelagh Street were well built up ; Duke Street and Hanover Street were full of fine houses ; houses with big gardens occupied Mount Pleasant ; and a dense mass of building was spreading along the riverside southwards. To the north expansion was slower, but building had extended as far as the modern canal basin.

*Now the site of Liverpool One

  REF: 4153


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-love-lane-wheelwright-works-1887
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Wheelwright Works Love Lane, Centre-North, L.3 - 1887

 

  REF: 4152


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-riot-damage-1919
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Riot Damage London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1919

 

  REF: 4151


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-1910
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1910

 

  REF: 4150


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1900

 

  REF: 4149


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-2-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1900

 

  REF: 4148


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-statue-of-george-III-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Statue of George III London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1831

 

  REF: 4147


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-london-road-and-the-gallows-mills-1809
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Gallows Mills London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1809

 

  REF: 4146


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-infirmary-brownlow-hill-2-1839
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Infirmary Brownlow Hill, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1839

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

THE INFIRMARY, situated in Brownlow-street, was opened for the reception of patients in 1824, having been erected from the designs of Mr. Foster, at an outlay of 27,000, in room of the old Infirmary in St. John's Lane, which was opened in 1749, and had become too small for the increasing population. Six Ionic columns, supporting a plain frieze and projecting cornice, (which is carried round the whole building,) form the portico at the front. The width at the back, including the wings which recede from the portico 82 feet, is 204 feet, and the depth from the front of the building to the back, 108 feet. Nearly twenty rooms on the ground floor afford accommodation for the officers of the Institution, committees, household, &c., except one large apartment in the left wing, which is fitted up as a ward-room for accidental cases.

The upper stories are entirely appropriated for patients, and additions have been recently made to the establishment, by which more ample accommodation is afforded. Out of twenty wards, five, containing upwards of one hundred beds, are allotted to surgical cases, four to medical cases for men, and the remainder are set apart for women. In the centre of the building is a steam engine which supplies the establishment with water, and with steam for cooking, works a mangle, and is applied to other useful purposes. In the yard is an elevated erection, on which is placed a clock, which can be seen from all parts of the building, and strikes the hours and quarters.

The utility of this Institution is proved by the number and variety of patients who are annually admitted. During 1841, 2186 patients were admitted, of which number only 135 cases proved fatal, and 1375 were cured. The average weekly number in the house was 212. The affairs of this charity are managed by a president, a committee of twenty-five, and the other officers of the Institution are, a consulting physician and two consulting surgeons, three physicians, three surgeons, a house surgeon, an apothecary, and a matron.

  REF: 4145


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-general-strike-london-road-1911
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The General Strike London Road, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1911

 

  REF: 4144


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-everton-toffee-1884
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Everton Brow, Everton, L.3 - 1884

 

  REF: 4143


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-cotton-exchange-1924
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Cotton Exchange Exchange Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1924

 

  REF: 4142


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-copperas-hill-tylers-mills-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Tylers Mills Copperas Hill, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1843

 

  REF: 4141


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-chisenhale-street-bridge-1935
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Canal Bridge Chisenhale Street, Centre-North, L.3 - 1935

 

  REF: 4140


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-chisenhale-street-1814
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Canal Bridge Chisenhale Street, Centre-North, L.3 - 1814

 

  REF: 4139


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l3-adelphi-hotel-and-the-big-house-ranelagh-street-1960
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Adelphi Hotel and the Big House Ranelagh Street, Centre-Town, L.3 - 1960

 

  REF: 4138


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-white-star-offices-james-street-1920
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: White Star Offices James Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1920

 

  REF: 4137


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-oriel-chambers-1941
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Bomb Damage WWII, Oriel Chambers Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1941

 

  REF: 4136


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-1905
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1905

 

  REF: 4135


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4134


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-water-street-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Water Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4133


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-1937
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Coronation Celebrations High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1937

 

  REF: 4132



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