Old Photos of Liverpool, Maps and Old Liverpool Books

 Liverpool City Group
  past and present

 



Welcome to our extensive gallery of old images of Liverpool. Mostly, they have been collected from our extensive library of old Liverpool books, all of which have been out of circulation for more than a 100 years.

In order to make these very rare Liverpool books availability for you today, we have meticulously and faithfully reproduced them in epub eBook format so you can see and purchase them for your own collection in our shop

Results that match your search: 57


Pages: 1 2 [>>]

Liverpool, history, liverpool-l8-herculaneum-potteries-and-south-shore-1794-11.5x6.8-300
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Herculaneum Potteries and South Shore , Dingle, L.8 - 1794

 

  REF: 4974


Liverpool, history, liverpool-l2-the-town-hall-2-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

 

  REF: 4966


Liverpool, history, liverpool-l2-high-street-1797-8.2x5.9-300
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1797

 

  REF: 4941


Liverpool, history, liverpool-l2-high-street-3-1797
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1797

 

  REF: 4940


Liverpool, history, liverpool-l2-burning-of-the-town-hall-3-1853
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Burning of the Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1853

 

  REF: 4926


Liverpool, history, liverpool-l1-hope-street-1750-11.2x7.0-300
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hope Street, Centre-Town, L.1 - 1750

 

  REF: 4893


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l36-roby-hall-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Roby Hall , Huyton, L36 - 1831

 

  REF: 4660


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l36-roby-hall-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Roby Hall , Huyton, L36 - 1800

 

  REF: 4659


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-churchyard-1926
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Child of Hale , Halewood, L26 - 1926

 

  REF: 4640


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-lighthouse-1949
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Lighthouse , Halewood, L26 - 1949

 

  REF: 4639


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-lighthouse-1945
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Lighthouse , Halewood, L26 - 1945

 

  REF: 4638


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-lighthouse-1905
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Lighthouse , Halewood, L26 - 1905

 

  REF: 4637


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-lighthouse-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Lighthouse , Halewood, L26 - 1900

 

  REF: 4636


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-old-hutte-c1900s
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Old Hutte , Halewood, L26 - 1900

 

  REF: 4635


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-old-hutte-1870
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Old Hutte , Halewood, L26 - 1870

 

  REF: 4634


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-old-hutte-c1800s
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Old Hutte , Halewood, L26 - 1800

 

  REF: 4633


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-childe-of-hale-hotel-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Childe of Hale Hotel , Halewood, L26 - 1900

 

  REF: 4632


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-demolition-1937
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall Demolition , Halewood, L26 - 1937

 

  REF: 4631


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall , Halewood, L26 - 1900

 

  REF: 4630


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-1881
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall , Halewood, L26 - 1881

 

  REF: 4629


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-1847
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall , Halewood, L26 - 1847

 

  REF: 4628


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-1830
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall , Halewood, L26 - 1830

 

  REF: 4627


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l26-halewood-hale-hall-1824
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall , Halewood, L26 - 1824

 

  REF: 4626


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l24-speke-aerial-view-halewood-fords-1962
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Fords , Halewood, L24 - 1962

 

  REF: 4600


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l24-hale-hall-1835
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall Hale, , L24 - 1835

 

  REF: 4561


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l24-hale-hall-1574
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Hale Hall Hale, , L24 - 1574

  As described in "Smith's Strangers Guide to Liverpool" in the year 1843

HALE HALL, nine miles south east of Liverpool, is the residence of John Blackburne, Esq., M.P. It has an ancient appearance and is partly covered with ivy. On the square tower in front is the date 1674, and the inscription " Built by Sir Gilbert Ireland, and Dame Margaret, his wife". In 1809 the south front was rebuilt in a style corresponding with the rest of the building. In this chapelry was born, in 1578, John Middleton, " THE CHILD OF HALE," who was possessed of extraordinary strength, and measured 9 feet 3 inches in height! He visited the court of James I., and a portrait of him is preserved in Brazenose College, Oxford.

  REF: 4560


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l23-crosby-jack-johnson-hall-road-sand-dunes-1907
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Jack Johnson, Crosby Sand Dunes Hall Road, Crosby, L23 - 1907

 

  REF: 4538


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l20-bootle-blitz-264-hawthorne-road-c1940
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Blitz Damage Hawthorne Road, Bootle, L20 - 1940

 

  REF: 4479


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l9-fazakerley-higher-lane-1935
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Higher Lane, Fazakerley, L.9 - 1935

 

  REF: 4338


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-overhead-railway-dingle
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Overhead Railway Herculaneum Dock, Dingle, L.8 - 1950

  at the transfer from the Dingle Terminus tunnel to the overhead track.

  REF: 4273


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-herculaneum-dingle
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Herculaneum Dock, Dingle, L.8 - 2006

  Showing the exit tunnel of the Overhead Railway from Dingle Station.

  REF: 4265


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-herculaneum-dock-1900
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The South Shore Herculaneum Dock, Dingle, L.8 - 1900

 

  REF: 4264


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-herculaneum-pottery
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Herculaneum Pottery Manufactory The South Shore, Dingle, L.8 - 1795

  An example of Liverpool Pottery.

  REF: 4263


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l8-history-herculaneum-china-and-earthenware-manufactory-1825
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: Herculaneum China and Earthenware Manufactory , Dingle, L.8 - 1825

  On the site of the old Herculaneum Dock which is now modern riverside housing.

  REF: 4262


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l4-walton-gaol-1907
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: H.M. Prison Hornby Road, Walton, L.4 - 1907

 

  REF: 4182


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-1937
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Coronation Celebrations High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1937

 

  REF: 4132


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-town-hall-2-1937
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Coronation Celebrations High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1937

 

  REF: 4131


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-tithebarn-street-railway-station-1850
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Railway Station Tithebarn Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1850

 

  REF: 4118


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-1848
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1848

 

  REF: 4115


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-2-high-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4113


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-interior-of-ballroom-high-street-1831
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Ballroom High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1831

 

  REF: 4112


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-high-street-1808
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1808

 

  REF: 4110


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-and-nelsons-monument-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall and Nelson's Monument High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4109


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4108


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-2-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4107


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-south-west-view-c1800
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1800

 

  REF: 4106


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-burning-high-street-2-1795
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Burning High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1795

 

  REF: 4105


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-the-town-hall-burning-high-street-1795
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Town Hall Burning High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1795

  As described in "Recollections of Old Liverpool" in the year 1863

I don’t believe there is another man in Liverpool alive at this time who saw the Town Hall on fire in 1795. I saw it, I may say, almost break out, for I was in Castle-street in ten minutes after the alarm had spread through the town, and that was soon done, for Liverpool was not of the extent it is now. I believe half the inhabitants turned out into the streets to witness that awful sight, although it was at five o’clock on a frosty Sunday morning in January. For my part, I was aroused by the continuous springing of rattles by the watchmen, and the rushing sounds of people running along the street. I was soon out of bed and joined the throng of people who were hurrying to the scene of disaster.

When I arrived there, a crowd had already assembled. Castle-street was then very narrow. It was quite choked up with people. Dale-street was beginning to be crowded while High-street and Water-street were quite impassable. From the windows of all the houses the terrified inmates were to be observed en dishabille, and the large inn in Water-street, the Talbot, which was nearly opposite the Town Hall, had people looking out at every window.

The smoke first made its appearance at the lower windows of the Town Hall. The doors having been forced, a party of men got into the interior of the building, and brought out for safety the books of the various departments, and some of the town’s officers having arrived, something like system took the place of the dreadful confusion which prevailed. The town records, the treasurer’s accounts, and the muniments, etc., were safely removed to a house at the end of High-street. I helped to keep order. Assisted by many other volunteers for the work we formed a lane so that there should be no impediment to a quick removal of anything that was portable. The fire was first discovered about five o’clock in the morning by the watchman on duty in the street. They were dull old fellows, those watchmen, and of but little use, for in calling the hour nine times out of ten they made a mistake. The thieves laughed them to scorn. When the watchman saw smoke issuing from the windows he gave the alarm without delay. The fire soon showed itself, when it had once got ahead. When the new Exchange was erected, after the former one had been taken down in 1748, somebody persuaded the authorities to have the woodwork and timber of the new building steeped in a composition of rosin and turpentine, so as to make the wood more durable. It may therefore be readily imagined how inflammable such a composition would make the wood, and how fiercely it burned when once ignited. There had been a perceptible odour of some sort experienced in the Exchange building for some days, and this was afterwards discovered to have arisen from the woodwork under the council-chamber having taken fire through a flue communicating from the Loan-office; and there is no doubt it had been smouldering for days before it actually made its appearance.

It could not have been ten minutes after I arrived on the spot before the flames burst out in all their fury. It was an awfully grand sight. It was yet dark. What with the rushing and pushing of the anxious crowd, the roaring of the fierce flames, and the calling of distracted people, it was an event and scene never to be forgotten. The building was soon all in a blaze, and nothing on earth could have stopped that frightful conflagration. It was a mercy it was a calm frosty morning or the houses in the four streets adjacent must have caught the flame. From the age of these houses, the quantity of timber in them, the narrowness of the streets, and the absence of a copious supply of water, I am sure Liverpool would have been half consumed if a wind had sprung up.

I thought the building looked like a great funeral pile as the flames roared out on all sides. It was a grand, yet dreadful sight. The whole of Castle-street was occupied by people, although, from the position of the Exchange, a full front view could not be obtained, it being almost parallel with the west side of Castle-street. The best view of it was where I stood at the top of Dale-street, by Moss’s bank. The dome, being constructed of wood, soon took fire, was burnt, and fell in. We had not then as now powerful engines, long reels of hose, and bands of active men well trained to their arduous and dangerous duties, still, everybody did his best and seemed desirous of doing something. We did that something with a will, but without much order, system, or discretion.

The engines in use were not powerful, and the supply of water was not only tardy but scanty, as you may believe when I tell you it had to be brought from the town wells, the Dye-house Well in Greetham-street, the Old Fall Well in Rose-street (where Alderman’s Bennett’s ironwork warehouse stands, near the corner of Rose-street-by the way, Rose-street was called after Mr. Rose, who lived in the house next the Stork Hotel), and the wells on Shaw’s-brow; indeed, every possible source where water could be obtained, was put in requisition. The inhabitants allowed the rain-water to be taken from their water-butts in the vicinity to such liberal extent that I verily believe there was not a drop of rain-water to be got for love or money when that eventful day was out.

Staid housewives for many a day after complained of the dirt the trampling of feet had made in their lobbies and yards, and deplored the loss of their stores of soft-water. At that time water was precious, every drop that could be obtained was saved, garnered, and carefully kept. Every drop of hard-water we consumed had to be brought to our doors and paid for by the "Hessian" or bucket. The water-carts were old butts upon wheels, drawn by sorry horses and driven by fat old creatures, half men half women in their attire and manners. The buckets were made of leather and the water was sold at a halfpenny per Hessian. They were so called, I believe, from their fancied resemblance to the Hessian boots. You may judge how inadequate a supply of water we had when our wants were dependent upon such aid.

The water-carts came rumbling and tumbling along the streets, in many cases losing one-half of their loads by the unusual speed at which they were driven and the awkwardness of their drivers. Water was also carted from the river, and I helped with others to push the carts up Water-street. The steep ascent of this street in its badly paved condition made this work extremely laborious. But everybody helped and did what they could, and those who did nothing made up for deeds by words and shouted and bawled and told the others what they ought to do.

Fortunately, only one life was lost, that of a fool-hardy young man who would press forward to see the fire better-he rushed up to the High-street door and a piece of timber fell on him. The surging of the crowd caused several persons to be struck down and trampled upon. I saved one woman’s life by beating off the people who would have crushed her. By twelve o’clock the fire had slackened considerably, and by the evening it was to all appearance subdued. But the fire in the interior remained smouldering for some time afterwards.

  REF: 4104


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-queen-victoria-memorial-lord-street-harrington-street-1950
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: The Queen Victoria Memorial Lord Street, Harrington Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1950

 

  REF: 4083


Liverpool, history, liverpool-history-l2-high-street-1843
Location: Liverpool

Category: history

Address: High Street, Centre-Town, L.2 - 1843

  As described in "A History of Liverpool" in the year 1907

The town proper consisted of the same little cluster of half-a-dozen streets which we have already noted as being laid out by King John. The central point was the High Street, sometimes called Juggler Street, perhaps because jongleurs or musicians took up their stand here on fair days. It ran north and south across the site of the Exchange Flags, and at each end of it was a town cross. Of the other streets, Chapel Street, Dale Street, and Castle Street already bore the names they bear to-day ; Water Street was known as Bank Street, Oldhall Street as Whitacre Street, and Tithebarn Street as Moor Street, being so called because it led to the Moor Green, a stretch of wet ground which lay near the upper end of the Pool.

Round this cluster of streets ran a wall, which left the river near the Old Hall, curved round Tithebarn Street to the lower end of Dale Street, and after following the line of the Pool, ran along the line of Lord Street and James Street to the river.

The streets were narrow, and, like those of other towns, very dirty. They must have been particularly bad before they were first paved in 1328. It was the duty of each burgess to keep the street clean in front of his own house, and it was one of the multifarious duties of the bailiffs to see that he did so. But if Liverpool was like other towns these duties were not very well fulfilled. The extreme dirt of any mediaeval town can scarcely be exaggerated ; and the entire absence of sanitation was one of the principal reasons for the terrible ravages of the plague.

We must not imagine very much traffic in these narrow and dirty streets. In the early mornings the swineherd would come along to collect the pigs from the crofts behind the cottages and drive them out upon the waste ; and on market days cattle would be driven along them, bellowing and jostling, to the market-place. But there would be little wheeled traffic, except that of a few springless country wains : there was no good carriage road out of Liverpool until the eighteenth century.

  REF: 4062



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